Miscellany

Spike Stitch

Using the spike stitch can change stripes into geometric designs. It is usually worked over rows of single crochet and, depending on how you place the hook, you can create squares, rectangles, triangles and diamonds.

  • Photo 1
  • Photo 2
  • Photo 3
  • Photo 4
  • Photo 5
  • Photo 6
  • 07169.P43
  • Working Spikes
  • 1. On Row 5, work longest spike just above foundation chain. See Photo 1.

    Photo 1
  • 2. For next spike, insert hook in stitch three rows below top of work. See Photo 2.

    Photo 2
  • 3. Pull yarn to front. Lift hook to top of work so yarn is neat and loose. See Photo 3.

    Photo 3
  • 4. For next stitch, insert hook two rows below top of work. See Photo 4.

    Photo 4
  • 5. For shortest spike stitch, insert hook one row below top. See Photo 5.

    Photo 5
  • 6. Work last stitch as normal sc. See Photo 6.

    Photo 6
  • Castle Spike Stitch
  • 1. Try this variation for the rug overleaf.
  • 2. Using main color yarn (M), make 25 ch (24 sts).
  • 3. Row 1: 1 sc in 3rd ch from hook, sc to end, 1ch, turn.
  • 4. Rows 2-4: Work in sc, changing to contrast color (C) on last stitch of last row.
  • 5. † Row 5: 1 ch to act as first sc, 3 sc, *4 sc into base of sts of row 1, 4 sc, rep from * once, 4 sc into base of sts of row 1, 1 ch, turn.
  • 6. Rows 6-8: Work 3 rows sc, change to M.
  • 7. Row 9: Work 3 sc into top of sts in row 4 to cover strip worked in C completely, *4 sc, work 4 sc into top of sts of Row 4, rep from * once, 4 sc, 1 ch, turn.
  • 8. Work 3 rows sc, changing to C on last st of last row ††.
  • 9. Rep from † to †† until work is required length. See Photo 7.

    Photo 7